The interview

  • Veterinary interview fails: how not to do it
    Searching for a job can be a daunting task – and the interview stage is arguably the scariest part of the process. It's also where many people fall short...
  • As well as preparing for standard interview questions, remember your prospective employer may throw in some seemingly random questions designed to throw you off your stride.
  • The way we find, apply for and interview for jobs is undergoing major changes, and telephone interviews are now a very common obstacle for jobseekers.
  • One of the most nerve-wracking aspects of a job interview is the knowledge that somebody is about to fire a number of searching questions at you. This can be seen as a Paxmanesque interrogation where everything said is doubted and each view is challenged – but these four tips will help you sail t...
  • Staying calm and relaxed in an interview is often key to winning the job. So how do you keep a cool head?
  • It’s a question that causes an immediate problem: are you really meant to say something negative about yourself that could spell the end for your application?
  • Interview jitters can make it difficult to come up with great responses on the spot, so try to anticipate the questions your interviewers will ask you and have the perfect answers ready in advance.
  • A job interview is not “just another conversation”, it's more like a sales call where, instead of trying to persuade a customer to purchase a product, you are selling yourself.
  • The dreaded “have you got any questions for us?” question will come at the end of most interviews, so it's best to have something prepared. Can't think of anything? Here are 5 killer questions for you to use... You're welcome!
  • Like it or not, how you dress will be seen as an indication of your approach to work, how confident you are, and even how much you value yourself.
  • To avoid making any attention grabbing mistakes of your own, learn from the successes and failures of other job candidates with a quick look at the dos and don'ts of creative interview techniques.
  • In the final part of her series on the interview process Jordan Sinclair warns not to rush in and accept the first job offered to you, but to take a little time to weigh up your options.
  • The third part of Jordan Sinclair’s series on the interview process sees her tackle the tricky subject of salary packages. In this article she highlights the numerous things to consider when negotiating remuneration with your potential employer.
  • In the second part of her series on the interview process Jordan Sinclair looks at the sort of questions you may be asked when applying for a vet role in practice, and suggests some to consider asking potential employers.
  • Drawing on her own experiences, vet Jordan Sinclair begins the first of a four-part series discussing the interview process with tips to ensure you are as ready as you'll ever be on the day.
  • Swapping your consult comfort zone for the corporate sphere can be a daunting prospect for some vets. To help soften the blow, Tony Noble of Noble Futures recruitment consultancy shares his tips for a smooth, successful transition.
  • It is surprisingly difficult to make the right clothing choice when attending an interview in a veterinary setting. First impressions are important so, ultimately, you want to impress when attending your interview.
  • Don't spend all your time worrying about the questions you'll be asked at interview. Instead, prepare some questions of your own to find out more about the practice you could be joining.
  • Unless you’re fortunate enough to be headhunted, it’s not easy to find a new job. You’ll need determination and some luck – and a good action plan to boost your campaign.
  • Presenting your prospective employer with the right impression through the clever use of body language could make the difference between a new career and rejection.