The interview

  • Interviews, pt 4: decision time
    In the final part of her series on the interview process Jordan Sinclair warns not to rush in and accept the first job offered to you, but to take a little time to weigh up your options.
  • The third part of Jordan Sinclair’s series on the interview process sees her tackle the tricky subject of salary packages. In this article she highlights the numerous things to consider when negotiating remuneration with your potential employer.
  • In the second part of her series on the interview process Jordan Sinclair looks at the sort of questions you may be asked when applying for a vet role in practice, and suggests some to consider asking potential employers.
  • Drawing on her own experiences, vet Jordan Sinclair begins the first of a four-part series discussing the interview process with tips to ensure you are as ready as you'll ever be on the day.
  • Swapping your consult comfort zone for the corporate sphere can be a daunting prospect for some vets. To help soften the blow, Tony Noble of Noble Futures recruitment consultancy shares his tips for a smooth, successful transition.
  • It is surprisingly difficult to make the right clothing choice when attending an interview in a veterinary setting. First impressions are important so, ultimately, you want to impress when attending your interview.
  • Don't spend all your time worrying about the questions you'll be asked at interview. Instead, prepare some questions of your own to find out more about the practice you could be joining.
  • Unless you’re fortunate enough to be headhunted, it’s not easy to find a new job. You’ll need determination and some luck – and a good action plan to boost your campaign.
  • Presenting your prospective employer with the right impression through the clever use of body language could make the difference between a new career and rejection.
  • Searching for a job can be a daunting task – and the interview stage is arguably the scariest part of the process. It's also where many people fall short...
  • Skills are crucial, but empathy is equally vital. It helps you to connect with clients and their pets, so it is wise to allow this aspect of your personality to shine through during the interview process.
  • Potential employers won’t just look at the things that make you suitable for your chosen role, they may also look for things that would make you unsuitable.
  • As well as preparing for standard interview questions, remember your prospective employer may throw in some seemingly random questions designed to throw you off your stride.
  • A lot has changed in the job world; the way we search, the way vacancies are advertised and so on. But one thing hasn’t really changed – the interview. Adam Bernstein advises on how you can become an interview winner.
  • There a few techniques veterinary nurses should keep in mind when going for an interview. Read Vet Times Jobs’ top 10 tips for vet nurse interviews.
  • Want to make your application for an academia veterinary job stand out? Have a read of Vet Times Jobs’ tips and advice, and search for current vacancies.
  • Are you looking for your next veterinary nurse job? Read Vet Times Jobs’ advice on how to write your CV, prepare for interview and manage your job hunt.
  • There a few dos and don’ts that veterinary graduates can put into action to help progress their job hunt. Read the Vet Times Jobs careers advice here.
  • Preparation for a job interview is vital in any sector – but for veterinary professionals, thinking ahead to potential questions comes with a little more importance.
  • Veterinary nurses need a specific set of soft skills – but what soft skills are the employer looking for? Find out in Vet Times Jobs’ career advice.