3 myths about veterinary careers busted!

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Lots of myths about veterinary careers exist – and if you’ve heard or read any of these, you may have a degree of trepidation when applying to study this field at university.

With this in mind, we have busted the top three most common myths.

1. All you will deal with is cats and dogs

While cats and dogs are probably the most popular pet and what general veterinary practitioners spend most of their time dealing with, other options exist.

You can train to specialise in small animals, such as hamsters and budgies or learn about reptiles and specialise in those. Zoos and wildlife reserves will deal with large animals, so if you fancy treating elephants and giraffes for a living, it’s something you can do.

2. Veterinary medicine is male-dominated

A lot of women can be deterred from going into a profession if it is male-dominated and the impression people have of veterinary surgeons is most are male, but this simply is not true.

While historically the case, the veterinary profession has changed rather substantially over the last decade or so, and a 2014 study by Vet Futures found 43% of practising vets in the UK were male and 57% female, while in veterinary schools in 2013, around 77% of students were female and 23% male.

3. Vet school is all you need to get a job

Vet school alone isn’t enough to get you a job, unfortunately. There are so many aspiring vets, it’s imperative you have some additional work experience to show your passion for the subject.

To help pad out your CV and impress employers, why not consider:

  • an internship at a veterinary surgery
  • working on a farm
  • helping in a zoo
  • volunteering for an animal rescue centre

If you’re thinking about becoming a veterinary surgeon or veterinary nurse and still feel unsure, visit Vet Times Jobs for the latest veterinary job listings and useful careers articles and advice. Also check out Vet Times CPD for courses dedicated to the ongoing development of vets and vet nurses.

Get in touch and we will get your veterinary career off to a flying start.

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